Koneswaram Temple in Sri Lanka and Questions...

I am exploring Hinduism, and the understanding in Hinduism that there is an order to the universe, and each individual has a place in that order that only they can preform. If one acts rightly in their duties here on earth, one moves closer to being unified with god. This is the Hindu way as I understand it.

The bull is an 11th century relic found at Koneswaram temple of Trincomalee, Sri Lanka - located on a high promontory with a beautiful view of the Indian Ocean

Worship, the verb itself and temples dedicated to it, is thought to be performed here in this spot since 205 BC

and as I walked around the temple, exploring the stories on its walls, I recognized that they felt eerily similar to the stories of many other religions I explore, in many other cultures and countries.

I was struck with questions in my mind.

Where did the stories begin? How did the details of worship, ritual and the practice of religion receive its commonalities?

And, when I Googled this temple to learn more of its history, I was amused, because I found this unsubstantiated quote in Wiki, "scholars have suggested that the worship of the almighty god Kona-Eiswara (one of Shiva's ancient forms) on the promontory is the most ancient form of worship existing".

And though, with my experience of life in exploring this very thing, I do not personally think this claim has merit -

I found it very interesting that this temple, a Hindu pilgrimage site, with its familiar to me stories on the walls with different characters, albeit with multiple heads and arms, acting in them -

This temple echoes my questions....

Where did the stories begin?

How did the details of worship, ritual and the practice of religion receive its commonalities across the cultures?

Sri Lanka, the explorations continue on...

LorettaScott Parker